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Better Sleep

Are Your Children Getting Enough Sleep?

by Denise Pummer |September 2, 2020 |0 Comments | Children and Adolescents, Health and Wellness, healthy sleep, sleep health, Sleep hygiene, Sleep Tips, Uncategorized | , , , ,

Perhaps your kids are getting more sleep than ever these days with their social activities strictly limited and more time at home. Boredom can increase sleep time, too. Or maybe your kids are pulling all-nighters watching Netflix, making TikTok videos, chatting with friends or, now that school has begun, doing homework and actually reading.

Whatever life’s activities are, everything can be done better and with more enthusiasm and joy when we are well-rested. The same rings true for your kids.

Depending on your child’s age, there are very specific recommendations about how much sleep they should get. Question is: are they? After all, it’s your job as a parent to ensure their wellbeing and since sleep is fundamental to growth and a strong immune system, to learning and their physical development as well as their emotional wellness, it should be a top priority.

While you, as an adult, likely have adapted to getting less sleep and still being able to get through your day, babies, children and teens don’t cope as well and need significantly more sleep than adults. A child’s early years are so important in terms of development.

So How Much Sleep is “Enough”?

Different amounts of sleep are needed through different stages of development, from babies to a child to a teen—sleep is part of a healthy, holistic lifestyle. So, what’s the rule of thumb? Here’s a chart giving age appropriate and science-based recommendations for total hours of sleep each day including night and daytime naps combined.

As with everything health-wise, knowing the rule of thumb is a great start, but of course, you know your child best. If your baby, child or teen seems to function better on even more sleep, use the above guidelines for sleep as a baseline and add more as you deem appropriate up until the maximum because there is such a thing as too much sleep. In these cases, you may want to evaluate the underlying reason for excessive sleep.

 

 

Health Repercussions of Poor Quality Sleep

As we’ve established, sleep is a healthy addition to a holistic lifestyle and critical for your child’s growth and development throughout childhood. This is because, just as sleep can have a positive effect on your child’s health, not getting enough sleep can lead to long lasting health effects if it persists.

Benefits of Sleep

What doesn’t sleep affect? Below is just a short list of the many benefits that sleep can have on your holistic health:

  • Improved attention
  • Appropriate and improved behavior
  • More effective learning
  • Stronger memory
  • Improved overall mental and physical health

Effects of Sleep Deprivation

The effects of sleep deprivation go far beyond sleepiness during the day. Here are just some of the negative effects that result from sleep deprivation in babies, children and teens:

  • A “bad mood”— Irritable, angry, easily frustrated
  • Short attention spans
  • Lack of memory and overall forgetfulness
  • Difficulty with learning
  • Low motivation and energy, fatigued or listless
  • Anxious, depressed
  • Developmentally delayed

Sometimes, half the battle is just getting your child, teen or babies to fall asleep and stay asleep.

How to Foster Good Sleep

Getting quality sleep can often be solved by employing some simple tactics and creating habits, including:

  • Create a calm, cool bedroom
  • Have a quality mattress
  • Make sleep a priority among all family members
  • Keep a regular daily routine and bedtime
  • Try an early bedtime (for children and babies, 7:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. is effective)
  • Stay active throughout the day with a mixture of physical and mental activities
  • Daily exposure to sunlight outdoors whenever possible
  • Resist the temptation to overschedule the day with strict tasks and activities
  • Good air flow and dust-free for better breathing
  • Limit screen time throughout the day, but especially 2 hours before bedtime
  • Be inquisitive—notice your child’s behavior and sleeping habits

In some cases, all that is needed to sleep better is creating the right environment for rest—starting with a cool, dark room and a natural, non-toxic bed. At SAMINA, we believe a Healthy Sleep Solution is a holistic solution.

To learn more about SAMINA healthy sleep products, contact us today and start sleeping better tonight.

Handsome senior man drinking a fresh glass of water at home

8 Ways to Stay Hydrated for Better Sleep

by Denise Pummer |August 11, 2020 |0 Comments | Anti-aging, Articles, Blogs, Health and Wellness, healthy skin, healthy sleep, Hydration, Hydration and Healthy Sleep, Performance & Recovery, skin health, sleep health, Sleep hygiene, Sleep Tips, Staying Hydrated | , , , , , , , , ,

When you consider how many different factors can negatively affect your sleep, dehydration isn’t usually high on the list. We all know that pillows, mattresses, room temperature, pre-bed routines, and body positioning play significant roles. But if you’ve been having trouble getting quality sleep and can’t find a culprit, you may want to explore dehydration as a possibility.

Keep reading to find out how dehydration affects your sleep and what you can do about it.

Potential Consequences of Dehydration

It is possible to be dehydrated even when you don’t feel thirsty, so relying on thirst alone to guide you is never a good idea. The consequences of dehydration can range from mild to severe, and include headaches, dizziness, confusion, fatigue, organ failure and even death in extreme cases. At night, dehydration can disrupt your sleep so you wake up not rested and still tired. It can also lead to a dry throat and nasal passages that lead to snoring and a raw, parched mouth in the morning. Trying to sleep while dehydrated can also lead to leg cramps and muscle spasms that will keep you up.

Surprisingly, dehydration actually increases the urge to use the bathroom in the middle of the night!

The Sleeping Environment and Dehydration

It makes sense that sleeping in a dry environment can dehydrate you faster than an environment with higher humidity levels. If your bedroom is particularly dry, you can become dehydrated while you sleep, or if you already are dehydrated, the situation will be made worse. And if you sleep in an environment that is conducive to dehydration, the sleep hormone melatonin may be affected, which can throw off your circadian rhythm and lead to poor quality sleep.

Sleep Duration and Dehydration

 In 2018, the journal Sleep published research that found adults that sleep six hours per night or less have a higher chance of being dehydrated than those who slept longer.

Some believe these findings indicate that poor sleep symptoms like fatigue, headache or muddled thinking that many people experience in the morning may be caused by dehydration during the night.

The research was performed on around 20,000 Chinese and US adults. Those who claimed to sleep six hours a night or fewer across both groups had a 59% higher risk of being dehydrated than those who slept seven to eight hours regularly. The key may be a hormone called vasopressin. While you sleep, your pituitary gland uses vasopressin to signal the kidneys to retain fluid. Typically, more vasopressin is released later on in the sleep cycle, which is a period the shorter duration sleepers don’t reach.

Fluid Loss During Sleep

It’s important to start the night well hydrated because you will lose fluid simply through the act of sleeping. The act of breathing leads to fluid loss, and this is exacerbated if you breathe through your mouth or snore during the night. As mentioned above, sleeping in a dry environment can increase fluid loss, as can exercising intensely in the evening or drinking alcohol to excess before bed.

Tips for Staying Hydrated at Night

It’s easy to assume that guzzling copious amounts of water before bed would be the solution to staying hydrated and having a more restful sleep, but that might not be the case. You may end up making multiple trips to the bathroom during the night, which would disrupt your sleep anyway.

It’s better to think of hydration as a whole day type of activity and not just think of it when you are faced with going to bed.

Some useful tips you can use include:

  1. Begin the hydration process as soon as you wake up by drinking a glass of water.
  2. Spread fluid intake throughout the day and never go more than a couple hours without consuming some water.
  3. Remember that water is the best beverage to help hydrate you. Drinks like tea, coffee and alcohol contain water but actually have the opposite effect.
  4. Eat foods with high water content like fruits and vegetables.
  5. Avoid caffeine for up to six hours before bed.
  6. Use a humidifier in your sleeping space, if needed.
  7. Drink more water if you work out heavily or sweat for another reason.
  8. Focus on getting seven to eight hours to maximize vasopressin levels.

Staying hydrated at night to avoid the negative effects of dehydration can be challenging, but it’s definitely within reach. At SAMINA, we have a wide range of products that can help you have a holistic, natural sleep and avoid sleep-related dehydration. For pricing or any other questions, request more information here.

Impact of Sleep on Mom Mental Health

Mom’s Mind – How Sleep Affects Mental Health For Mothers

by Claus Pummer |May 14, 2020 |0 Comments | Blogs, Sleep Tips | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Having a child can be a beautiful thing, but of course, there are some changes to your daily habits and health that can drastically change with the introduction of a newborn into your world. But did you know that it is highly common for mothers (and fathers, to a lesser extent) to feel sleep-deprived well into a child’s life?

What This 2019 Study Had to Say

If you’re the proud mother of a five or six-year-old, you may still be experiencing the effects of sleep deprivation. According to a study published in the Sleep Journal by the Sleep Research Society, both men and women experienced a below-average level of satisfaction with their sleep quality and length.

In both women and men, sleep satisfaction and duration did not fully recover for up to 6 years after the birth of their first child.

Sleep and Mental Health

Besides reducing cognitive ability, sleep deprivation takes the shape of changes in mental health in many mothers. Today’s Parent’s article on sleep and mental health lists mental health repercussions from a lack of sleep, specifically around anxiety and depression.

The mental health conditions can be exacerbated or brought on by the lack of sleep and subsequent mood swings that occur as a result of sleep deprivation. Low moods can occur after one night of lacklustre sleep, but add four more years onto that and it’s safe to say that many parents’ moods, from frustration to impatience to anger, can be attributed to chronic sleep issues.

Making the Most of Sleep

So sleep affects a mother’s mental health – what can be done about it?

Sleep can be confusing to manage, with so many tips and tricks to test out. While a bedtime routine and even your day leading up to sleep are important factors to focus on, starting with a luxury mattress that will support you both mentally and physically can help you make the most of every minute asleep.

After years working on sleep health and psychology, our top recommendations for improving your sleep as a parent include:

Creating and Sticking to a Schedule

This means that you have to plan your sleep ahead of time and draw boundaries around your sleep schedule as much as possible. This might feel fairly easy for you, but for many, this may include developing a shift schedule with you and your partner to protect the quality of your sleep as much as possible.

Create A Short Yet Effective Bedtime Routine

You may not feel like you have enough time to have your own bedtime routine, but it’s important to introduce consistency to alert your body that it is time to sleep – therefore making every minute in bed count. This can simply mean having the same tea every night half an hour before bed, lighting a candle with a specific scent or staying screen-free for an hour before bed.

Build Your Comfortable Sleep Toolkit

Many factors can affect your quality of sleep, including your sleep comfort. A luxury mattress that is created with careful attention to materials and requirements, will be able to physically and mentally support you and your quality of sleep.

SAMINA’s Bio-Ceramic® Bedding

SAMINA has created a sleep system that includes luxury mattress bedding made from 60% organic cotton and 40% Bio-Ceramic® yarn. Bio-Ceramic® yarn delivers healthy infrared radiation and negative ions, both of which encourage healthy sleep patterns for users. These benefits help your body’s microcirculation, energy restoration, more drowsiness to promote the initial transition to sleep and optimal ambient heat and moisture.

Further, the construction of the bedding carefully considers physical support and how stress on the body can be reduced for a more restful and relaxed sleep.

A Last Word on Improved Mental Health and Performance

Dr. Liborio Parrino, Chair of the World Sleep Day Committee, stated in the World Sleep Day Toolkit:

“Extending our sleep period also improves our mental and body performances during the day and, last but not least, enhances our dreaming experience, as REM stages are mostly concentrated in the final portion of sleep, which is often curtailed by the urging rules of modern life.”

Better Sleep

Make sleep your priority. SAMINA sleep systems, including their luxury eco-friendly mattress, all of which are constructed to deliver comfortable sleep with the added health benefits of non-toxic mattress materials. Parents, we know you are tired. Let us help you restore your healthy sleep patterns and make the most of your time both awake and asleep. Contact us and request more information about SAMINA sleep systems here.